Daniel TortoraCarolina in Crisis: Cherokees, Colonists, and Slaves in the American Southeast, 1756-1763

University of North Carolina Press, 2015

by Bob Wintermute on December 17, 2015

Daniel Tortora

View on Amazon

Long viewed conventionally through the lens of inter-European/colonist conflict, warfare in colonial era North America is currently experiencing a resurgence as a new generation of military historians employ a variety of tools and methods borrowed from other fields and disciplines. Our latest guest, Daniel Tortora, does so in his book Carolina in Crisis: Cherokees, Colonists, and Slaves in the American Southeast, 1756-1763 (University of North Carolina Press, 2015). By focusing on the French and Indian War's Southern theater, particularly in the two Carolinas and Virginia, Tortora crafts a unique account of an area generally overlooked in the face of the larger body of scholarship focused on events in the Northern Colonies and Canada. Carolina in Crisis employs a conceptual narrative and analytical framework often associated with Borderlands theory to craft an intricate account of conflict and how it was viewed across three different cultural boundaries: white European, native American, and enslaved Africans. The end product is a rich and rewarding addition to the historiography of early American warfare.

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Patrick HagopianAmerican Immunity: War Crime and the Limits of International Law

January 26, 2016

After World War II, the newly formed United Nations and what might be called a global community of nations that included the United States, worked to create a more extensive code of international law. The urge stemmed from the events of World War II, including the atrocities of the war that resulted in war crimes […]

Read the full article →

Peter ThorsheimWaste into Weapons: Recycling in Britain during the Second World War

December 17, 2015

In Waste into Weapons: Recycling in Britain during the Second World War (Cambridge University Press 2015), Peter Thorsheim explores the role of waste and recycling in Britain under conditions of total war. Thorsheim argues wartime salvage efforts linked civilians socially as well as materially to the war. Salvage drives served to focus people's efforts and helped […]

Read the full article →

Jennifer MittelstadtThe Rise of the Military Welfare State

December 10, 2015

[Cross-posted from Who Make Cents?] Have you seen those Facebook memes floating around, arguing that we shouldn't support a 15-dollar-per-hour minimum wage for service sector workers because the military doesn't earn a living wage? Jennifer Mittelstadt tells us how these stark lines were drawn between the military and the civilian economy – and on how military […]

Read the full article →

Nicholas StargardtThe German War: A Nation Under Arms, 1939–1945

November 18, 2015

In all of the thousands upon thousands of books written about Nazi Germany, it's easy to lose track of some basic questions.  What did Germans think they were fighting for?  Why did they support the war?  How did they (whether the they were soldiers fighting in France or Russia, women working to support the war […]

Read the full article →

John KinderPaying with Their Bodies: American War and the Problem of the Disabled Veteran

October 6, 2015

John Kinder brings to life the challenges and problems faced by the disabled veteran in American history from the Civil War to the current day in his evocative book, Paying with Their Bodies: American War and the Problem of the Disabled Veteran (University of Chicago Press, 2015). Considered by many reviewers to be one of […]

Read the full article →

Derek J. PenslarJews and the Military: A History

October 1, 2015

In Jews and the Military: A History (Princeton University Press, 2015), Derek J. Penslar, the Stanley Lewis Professor of Israel Studies at the University of Oxford and the Samuel Zacks Professor of Jewish History at the University of Toronto, explores the expansive but largely forgotten story of Jews in modern military service. Over more than three centuries, […]

Read the full article →

Leonard CassutoThe Graduate School Mess: What Caused It and How We Can Fix It

September 22, 2015

The discontented graduate student is something of a cultural fixture in the U.S. Indeed theirs is a sorry lot. They work very hard, earn very little, and have very poor prospects. Nearly all of them want to become professors, but most of them won't. Indeed a disturbingly large minority of them won't even finish their degrees. It's little […]

Read the full article →

Terrence J. FinneganA Delicate Affair on the Western Front: America Learns How to Fight a Modern War in the Woevre Trenches

September 14, 2015

In his second book, author Terrence J. Finnegan describes America's early experience fighting the Germans during World War I. Finnegan's A Delicate Affair on the Western Front: America Learns How to Fight a Modern War in the Woevre Trenches (The History Press, 2015) provides in-depth research and a great deal of context to portray the 26th "Yankee" Division's […]

Read the full article →

Dan StoneThe Liberation of the Camps: The End of the Holocaust and its Aftermath

August 25, 2015

Every year I ask my students to tell me when the Holocaust ended.  Most of them are surprised to hear me say that it has not yet. Today's podcast is the fourth of a summer long series of podcasts about the system of camps and ghettos that pervaded Nazi Germany, its satellite states and the […]

Read the full article →