Elizabeth SchmidtForeign Intervention in Africa: From the Cold War to the War on Terror

January 21, 2015

[Cross-posted from New Books in African Studies] Elizabeth Schmidt's Foreign Intervention in Africa: From the Cold War to the War on Terror (Cambridge University Press, 2013) depicts the foreign political and military interventions in Africa during the periods of decolonization (1956-75) and the Cold War (1945-91), as well as the periods of state collapse (1991-2001) and the “global war on […]

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Glen Jeansonne and David LuhrssenWar on the Silver Screen: Shaping America’s Perception of History

January 5, 2015

[Cross-posted from New Books in Film] War has been a constant topic for feature films since the invention of the motion picture camera. These events made for interesting stories and dynamic visual representations. In their book, War on the Silver Screen: Shaping America's Perception of History (Potomac Books, 2014),  Glen Jeansonne and David Luhrssen discussed a number of films that dealt with conflicts over […]

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Charles F. WalkerThe Tupac Amaru Rebellion

December 23, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Latin American Studies]  Charles F. Walker’s book The Tupac Amaru Rebellion (Harvard University Press, 2014) charts the rise, fall, and legacy of a massive uprising in colonial Peru.  Indigenous societies in the Andes labored under heavy taxes, tributes, and discrimination imposed by the Spanish imperial state.  Walker’s monograph follows the rebellion of […]

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Mark R. AndersonThe Battle for the Fourteenth Colony: America’s War of Liberation in Canada, 1774-1776

December 15, 2014

My most current guest is Mark R. Anderson, author of The Battle for the Fourteenth Colony: America’s War of Liberation in Canada, 1774-1776 (University Press of New England, 2014).  Anderson’s award-winning book presents the most detailed and nuanced study of the entire Quebec campaign in print today.  Long an under-represented campaign in the general historiography […]

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Boyd CothranRemembering the Modoc War: Redemptive Violence and the Making of American Innocence

December 9, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Native American Studies] If George Armstrong Custer had kept off of Greasy Grass that June day in 1875, Vine Deloria, Jr.'s manifesto might well have been called "Canby Died For Your Sins." The highest ranking U.S. military official to be killed in the so-called "Indian Wars," General Edward Canby's death at the […]

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Michelle MoydViolent Intermediaries: African Soldiers, Conquest, and Everyday Colonialism in German East Africa

December 4, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in African Studies] In her imaginative and scrupulous book, Violent Intermediaries: African Soldiers, Conquest, and Everyday Colonialism in German East Africa (Ohio University Press, 2014), historian Michelle Moyd writes about the askari, Africans soldiers recruited in the ranks of the German East African colonial army. Praised by Germans for their loyalty and courage, the askari were reviled by […]

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John Morrow and Jeffrey SammonsHarlem’s Rattlers and the Great War: The Undaunted 369th Regiment and the African American Quest for Equality

November 4, 2014

John Morrow and Jeffrey Sammons share their insights on the story of the fabled 369th Infantry Regiment in their book, Harlem’s Rattlers and the Great War: The Undaunted 369th Regiment and the African American Quest for Equality (University Press of Kansas, 2014).  Our guests reveal a great deal about the state of African Americans in prewar New […]

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Beth LinkerWar’s Waste: Rehabilitation in World War I America

September 23, 2014

Beth Linker is the author of War’s Waste: Rehabilitation in World War I America (University of Chicago Press, 2011).  As she reveals, the story of individual rehabilitation from war-related injury was intertwined with other political concerns at multiple levels.  These century-old accounts matter greatly, as the First World War was that point where modern rehabilitative […]

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Guy ChetThe Ocean is a Wilderness: Atlantic Piracy and the Limits of State Authority, 1688-1856

September 22, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Law] Guy Chet, Associate Professor of early American and military history at the University of North Texas, in his book The Ocean is a Wilderness: Atlantic Piracy and the Limits of State Authority, 1688-1856 (University of Massachusetts Press, 2014) makes a well-crafted argument for the persistence of Atlantic piracy in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, after the […]

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Willard SunderlandThe Baron’s Cloak: A History of the Russian Empire in War and Revolution

September 4, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies] The Russian Empire once extended from the Baltic Sea to the Sea of Japan and contained a myriad of different ethnicities and nationalities. Dr. Willard Sunderland's The Baron's Cloak: A History of the Russian Empire in War and Revolution (Cornell University Press, 2014) is an engaging new take on the empire […]

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